Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Environmental Conservation And Preservation

  • Updated

In a wealthy enclave nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains that is a haven for celebrities, residents now face more aggressive consequences for wasting water — including the threat of having their water flows slowed to a trickle if they repeatedly flout conservation rules.

  • Updated

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Wildlife rehabilitators are decontaminating dozens of alligators, brushing their pointy teeth and scrubbing their scaly hides in the weeks after a pipeline rupture dumped 300,000 gallons (1.1 million liters) of diesel fuel into a New Orleans area wetland.

  • Updated

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Biden administration is moving to tighten oversight of projects that benefitted from Trump-era loosened water protections, but some projects including a controversial Georgia mine will likely be able to escape new scrutiny.

  • Updated

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has dismissed another member of a state panel that oversees wildlife conservation and hunting and fishing regulations as a dispute percolates over public access to streams and rivers that flow through private property.

  • Updated

HONOLULU (AP) — After initially resisting, the U.S. Navy will comply with Hawaii's order to remove fuel from a massive underground storage tank facility near Pearl Harbor blamed for contaminating drinking water, officials said Tuesday.

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The state of Montana is increasing its base pay for seasonal firefighters to a minimum of $15.50 per hour to help recruit and retain highly qualified personnel, Gov. Greg Gianforte and the state Department of Natural Resources and Conservation said Monday.

  • Updated

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Twenty of Yellowstone National Park's renowned gray wolves roamed from the park and were shot by hunters in recent months — the most killed by hunting in a single season since the predators were reintroduced to the region more than 25 years ago, according to park officials.

RENO, Nev. (AP) — A federal judge said Tuesday he intends to temporarily block any construction work for 90 days at a proposed geothermal power plant in Nevada that opponents said would destroy a sacred tribal site and could result in extinction of a rare toad being considered for endangered species protection.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Trending

Breaking News