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    There will be 14 students from Historically Black College and University medical schools working for the first time on the staffs of NFL clubs this season. The students are coming from the four HBCU medical schools in the country and will be working with eight different teams. The teams include Atlanta, Cincinnati, the Los Angeles Rams, LA Chargers, New York Giants, San Francisco, Tennessee and Washington. The program aims to diversify staffs across sports medicine. A study shows Black medical students comprise only 7.3% of the total in this country. The NFL has nearly 70% Black players.

      Kyle Pitts likes to set goals. One thing is definitely on his mind after a brilliant rookie season: getting to end zone more often. Pitts was held to a single touchdown catch in 2021, which is about the only thing he had to complain about in his Falcons debut. He tallied 68 receptions for 1,026 yards and earned a trip to the Pro Bowl. Blessed with a receiver’s speed, Pitts fits right in with a new generation of tight ends who are far more than just an extra blocker.

        Browns return specialist Jakeem Grant Sr. was placed on injured reserve after tests confirmed he tore his left Achilles tendon during practice. Grant will miss the season, forcing Cleveland to find another option to fix its lackluster return game. The 5-foot-6 Grant signed a three-year contract worth up to $13.8 million in March. Grant got hurt at the end of a pass route in one-on-one drills while battling cornerback A.J. Green for the ball. Grant suffered a similar tear in 2018 with Miami.

          The performance didn’t come close to matching the hype for the 2021 quarterback class. With QBs going 1-2-3 for third time ever in the common draft era and five going off the board in the first round for the fourth time, expectations were high for Trevor Lawrence and Co. But whether it was from lack of opportunity, lack of support or normal rookie struggles, the six rookie quarterbacks who made multiple starts last season were mostly underwhelming with the exception of New England’s Mac Jones and Houston’s Davis Mills.

            The Carolina Panthers aren’t planning to change their approach with Christian McCaffrey, even though the star running back has missed 23 of the last 33 regular-season games due to injuries. It’s full speed ahead when it comes to McCaffrey this season. Panthers coach Matt Rhule says he's not going to worry about McCaffrey getting hurt again, saying "we are thinking about Christian in one way only, and that’s attack.” McCaffrey averaged nearly 30 touches per game through the first two games of last season before going down with a hamstring injury in a Week 3 Thursday night game against the Houston Texans. Rhule says it's too soon to know many touches per game McCaffrey will get this season.

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            Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow is still healing from an appendectomy two weeks ago, and coach Zac Taylor said there is no timetable for his participation in training camp. The third-year quarterback has been observing practice from a golf cart or scooter. Burrow's father, Jimmy Burrow, told radio analyst Dave Lapham last week that it might be a “few weeks” before his son is able to practice. The Bengals got some good news when right tackle La’ el Collins was cleared to practice. Taylor says few if any starters will play in the first preseason game Friday.

            The momentum Joshua Palmer built up last season with the Los Angeles Chargers has continued through the first two weeks of training camp. Palmer has emerged as the team’s third wide receiver for when the regular season opens on Sept. 11 against the Las Vegas Raiders. Palmer showed consistency over the final five games last season, with 18 of his 33 receptions and three of his four touchdowns coming during that span.

            Parris Campbell arrived in Indianapolis four years ago with big expectations. The versatile, speedy receiver from Ohio State seemed like a perfect fit in coach Frank Reich's offense. But a series of injuries have limited Campbell to just 15 games in three years. Now, in the final season of his contract, Campbell says he's healthy and ready to put together the breakout season everyone's anticipated.

            There will be 14 students from Historically Black College and University medical schools working for the first time on the staffs of NFL clubs this season. The students are coming from the four HBCU medical schools in the country and will be working with eight different teams. The teams include Atlanta, Cincinnati, the Los Angeles Rams, LA Chargers, New York Giants, San Francisco, Tennessee and Washington. The program aims to diversify staffs across sports medicine. A study shows Black medical students comprise only 7.3% of the total in this country. The NFL has nearly 70% Black players.

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